Tim Garrett

 
 
Education

University of Washington, Ph.D., Atmospheric Sciences, 2000
University of Washington, M.S. Atmospheric Sciences, 1995 
University of Waterloo, B.Sc. Honours Physics, 1992

Positions

Professor, Atmospheric Sciences, University of Utah, 2014 - present
Associate Professor, Atmospheric Sciences, University of Utah, 2008 - 2014
Co-Founder and President, Fallgatter Technologies, 2011 - present
Visiting Professor, Université Blaise-Pascal II, France, 2013
Visiting Professor, Université de Lille I, France, 2008 - 2009
Assistant Professor, Meteorology, University of Utah, 2002 - 2008
Huber Fellow, Princeton Environmental Institute, Princeton University, 2000 - 2002

Activities
My research focuses on the physics of clouds. Clouds and precipitation are interesting because they display such an extraordinarily wide range of interactive physical processes. Understanding them is critical for improving weather and climate forecasts. 

I also develop simple physical models for describing civilization growth. While clouds and economics may seem disconnected, both are complex systems that evolve according to non-equilibrium thermodynamic rules.

Much of this work is done in collaboration with graduate students in the ACCS group. Some involves pencil and paper, PCs, or parallel computing environments. There is also laboratory and field work. With engineer Cale Fallgatter, we design and build instruments for photographing snowflakes in freefall and make them available to researchers through our start-up company Fallgatter Technologies. We deploy these instruments to our High Altitude Research Laboratory for Diversity in Snow (HARoLDS) at Alta Ski Area in Utah’s Wasatch Front. 

When not doing research, I teach graduate and undergraduate classes in Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Radiation and Thermodynamics, and I serve as a co-editor for the Copernicus open access journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.http://fall-tech.com/Group.htmlhttp://www.inscc.utah.edu/~tgarrett/Snowflakes/MASC.htmlhttp://fall-tech.com/http://www.alta.com/pages/snowflakeshowcase.phphttp://www.inscc.utah.edu/%7Etgarrett/6300/6300/6300.htmlhttp://www.inscc.utah.edu/%7Etgarrett/6300/6300/6300.htmlhttp://www.inscc.utah.edu/%7Etgarrett/6200/6200/6200.htmlhttp://www.inscc.utah.edu/~tgarrett/5130/5130.htmlhttp://www.atmospheric-chemistry-and-physics.net/http://www.inscc.utah.edu/~tgarrett/Garrett.htmlshapeimage_2_link_0shapeimage_2_link_1shapeimage_2_link_2shapeimage_2_link_3shapeimage_2_link_4shapeimage_2_link_5shapeimage_2_link_6shapeimage_2_link_7shapeimage_2_link_8shapeimage_2_link_9

Select Publications


Long-run evolution of the global economy Part I: Physical basis Earth’s Future


Ground based remote sensing of thin clouds in the Arctic. Atmos. Meas. Tech. 2013


Can we predict long-run economic growth? Retirement Management Journal, 2012 PRESS


A simple framework for the dynamic response of cirrus clouds to local diabatic radiative heating J. Atmos. Sci. 2012


Fallspeed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in freefall. Atmos. Meas. Tech. PRESS


Modes of Growth in Dynamic Systems Proc. Roy. Soc. A, 2012


No way out? The double-bind in seeking global prosperity alongside mitigated climate change, Earth System Dynamics, 2012


The role of scavenging in the seasonal transport of black carbon and sulfate to the Arctic, Geophys. Res. Lett., 2011 PRESS


Space-based evaluation of interactions between aerosols and low-level Arctic clouds during the Spring and Summer of 2008 Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2011


Are there basic physical constraints on future anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide? Climatic Change, 2011. DISCUSSION CRITICISMS PRESS


Mammatus clouds as a response to cloud base radiative heating J. Atmos. Sci. , 2010


An evolving history of Arctic aerosols. Bull. Amer. Meteorol. Soc., 2008 PRESS


Comments on "Effective radius of ice cloud particle populations derived from aircraft probes" J. Atmos. Oceanic. Technol., 2007


Increased Arctic cloud longwave emissivity associated with pollution from mid-latitudes. Nature, 2006 PRESS


Convective formation of pileus cloud near the tropopause Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2006


Evolution of a Florida cirrus anvil, J. Atmos. Sci., 2005


Small, highly reflective ice crystals in low-latitude cirrus. Geophys. Res. Lett., 2003 PRESS




Professor

Department of Atmospheric Sciences

University of Utah

tim.garrett at utah.edu

(801) 581-5768

Curriculum Vitae